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Benefits

Light, views

Given the bureaucratic title of "transparent components", windows light a room and allow the (visual) connection between the inside and outside. These are two factors that have a decisive influence not only on the use of a room, but also on the users. The availability of daylight has a positive effect on the human psyche and on performance. Hence the more daylight the better, surely. However, designing windows is always a matter of weighing up the public and the private, the view to the inside and the view to the outside, usable wall area and opening, light incidence and heat loss, brightness and overheating in summer.

Daylight

Interior brightness

Daylight

Interior brightness

 

Adequate brightness in interior rooms is determined via the daylight factor. The daylight factor D is defined as the ratio of illuminance E (in lux) at one point in a room to the simultaneous horizontal external illuminance Ea under an unobstructed sky. The daylight factor is a constant for every point in the room.

 

 

Today, daylight is seen as the actual light in rooms which, when necessary, can be supplemented by artificial light. The minimum requirement for the size of the window areas can be regulated extensively via standards and regulations in accordance with the relevance for the functionality and the usage quality of the room. These are based on the location and type of the property. Therefore, in each case, national and property-specific requirements and regulations must be taken into account with regard to daylight lighting.

The architectural treatment of daylight offers various design possibilities — provided there is a well thought-out light concept. Light can therefore guide you specifically through a building or brightness can create zones in rooms.

Visual connections

Visual connections

Contact with the outside

 

The thought of lighting a room exclusively via fanlights automatically brings a feeling of unease, as the view outside has its own qualities. It creates a relationship between the user and the environment, and between the building and the surrounding area. With a deliberate design, the visual connection gives the room — and with that, the building — its own unique character, either open and extrovert with large openings to the outside, or introvert with small openings. And there is no need to sacrifice daylight if atriums are used for lighting, for example. Deliberately selected view axes to a striking point outside anchor the building in its location. And last but not least, the view to the outside lends a feeling of security, allowing you to assess what conditions await you or who is approaching the building.